Tag archive for "Scooters"

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What Do Mobility Scooters Consist Of?

No Comments 17 September 2010

What Do Mobility Scooters Consist Of?

What Do Mobility Scooters Consist Of?

Mobility Scooters usually consist of a base unit, the drive chain, the seat, and tiller, as well as the batteries and wheels. The base unit is the chassis that the other components are attached to. This chassis provides the area where the feet go in between the tiller and the batteries or drive chain. The drive chain is the part that powers the scooter. The tiller is the handlebar that steers the mobility scooter.

Front wheel drive mobility scooters have the drive train just over the front wheel. These sorts of scooter have a smaller weight capacity and are much more suited to indoor use than outdoor use compared to a rear wheel driver mobility scooter. They directly drive the front wheel, and so are not as good up hills as rear wheel drive scooters. Front wheel drive scooters also tend to be small/boot scooters rather than larger pavement or road legal scooters. Rear wheel drive mobility scooters use a chain, belt or transaxle mechanism to drive the rear wheels. Rear wheel drive scooters “push” the rider whereas front wheel drive scooters “pull” the rider. This offers more power and efficiency and so provides a better ride, and allows the scooter to go up steeper hills.

Mobility scooters use electro magnetic regenerative brakes which work by slowing and then stopping the scooter as soon as the user releases the controls. When the brakes are applied, the batteries are recharged by the excess power from the motor. This type of brake means that a separate hand brake is not necessary, and that the scooter can be left on a slope without fear of it rolling away. Most mobility scooters have a freewheel mode so that the scooter can be moved with out it being switched on, perhaps for storage, or in case of an emergency.

The batteries on a mobility scooter are not the same as car or motorcycle batteries, and should not be substituted. Car and motorcycle batteries are starter batteries, designed to provide short bursts of power. The batteries should be charged and looked after as per the mobility scooter manual.

The number of wheels and size and type of tyre affect the stability and ride quality of the mobility scooter. Smaller scooters tend to have small solid tyres, which don’t offer the same ride quality as bigger scooters with larger pneumatic tyres. Three wheel scooters offer more legroom and a smaller turning circle compared to a four wheel scooter, but the stability can be compromised.

Mobility scooter seats often have folding armrests, and swivel to aid getting on and off the scooter. The seat is often padded to provide more comfort. Some models have a larger Captain or Admiral seat, which is more like a car seat, and may offer more adjustment than a standard seat. The larger, more comfortable seats are normally found on the larger scooters as the scooter has a larger range, so the distance travelled could be almost double that of a small scooter. Almost all seats are adjustable for height, some adjust for reach, and some even recline like a car seat.

The tiller controls the direction, and speed of the mobility scooter, and is like a bicycle handle bar. The scooter moves by either pulling or pushing the lever on the tiller (called a wigwag). Some models of scooter have a Delta tiller meaning that the user can either pull with the fingers (like a bicycle brake) to make the scooter move, or push with the thumb. This tiller is ideal for people with limited hand mobility or who have one hand much better than the other. This means they can use the same hand for both moving forward and reversing. The control panel on the tiller includes the battery gauge, the speed control, and the horn and light controls, where fitted.

The scooters speed is usually controlled by a rotary control, which ranges from low speed to high speed. On some 6 and 8mph mobility scooters there is a switch that lowers the top speed from 6/8 mph to 4mph to make it pavement legal.

Mobility Scooters are designed to be simple to understand and operate, and so shouldn’t be intimidating.

For more information about mobility scooters, please visit www.scootamart.com


Just over 2 mins long so hold on till the end but what a blast we had…enjoy. Big shout out to all involved in the project.

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A Guide to Mobility Scooters

No Comments 14 August 2010

A Guide to Mobility Scooters

A mobility scooter can be of great benefit to anyone who suffers from arthritis or circulation problems as well as other medical complaints. Mobility scooters are very easy to use, and shouldn’t be daunting. Despite all the various models and types to choose from, they all work in similar ways. The main differences are the number of wheels (three or four), the maximum speed, and the size of the disabled scooter.


Three wheel electric scooters are ideal for using indoors, especially in the home or in a shop, as they have a smaller turning circle than the equivalent four wheel model, which makes them easy to manoeuvre. Four wheel disabled scooters were previously perceived to be more stable but, due to technological advances, there is very little difference in stability between three and four wheel scooters these days. Most mobility scooter manufacturers offer three and four wheel versions of the same model.


What the disabled scooter is going to be used for, and how often it is going to be used, will help to determine which model will be best. For example, somebody purchasing a mobility scooter which will be used daily to replace a car has different needs to someone purchasing a mobility scooter that will be carried in the car and used primarily at weekends for travelling short distances.


Mobility scooter batteries are rechargeable and depending on the model of scooter, and will allow the mobility scooter to travel in excess of 30 miles. The smaller boot scooters have a range of around 10-15 miles depending on the model. The batteries can sometimes be upgraded to provide better performance, or an additional battery pack can be carried on the scooter to effectively double the range of the electric scooter.


Mobility scooters normally require a key to start them and are immobile without the key. This allows the electric scooter can be left outside a shop or house safely and securely, and prevents unauthorised use. Disabled scooters have a freewheel mode, which allows the scooter to be moved, without the scooter being turned on. This makes storing and transporting your electric scooter easier, and can assist when the batteries are charging and it needs moving.


Disabled scooters are steered using the tiller which is similar to a bicycle or motorbike handlebar. The tiller is usually adjustable, depending on the model, and can often be dropped down for transportation. Mobility scooters are driven using the thumb or fingers pushing or pulling a lever. This control is called a “wig wag” and works on the “see saw” principle. If the forward lever is pushed, it is the same as pulling on the reverse lever, and vice versa. Some models are driven by pushing the lever with the thumb, whilst others are driven by pulling the lever with the fingers, like a bicycle brake. A Delta handlebar means that both forward and reverse can be controlled using the same hand. This is fitted as standard on some disabled scooter models and available as an optional extra on others.


The speed of the mobility scooter is determined by the amount of pressure put on the forward / reverse lever. The overall speed of the disabled scooter is governed by the speed dial on the control panel. When getting used to the electric scooter, it may be better to use a lower speed setting. On the road legal mobility scooters, there is usually a switch which lowers the maximum speed from 8mph to 4mph, which then allows the scooter to be used legally on a pavement.


In order to slow down, the user just needs to release the forward or reverse lever which then brings the mobility scooter to a stop. Disabled scooters have regenerative brakes fitted, which mean that the scooter can be left on a slope with out fear of it rolling away. An emergency bicycle style brake is fitted to some models for additional safety and security.


Class 3, 8mph mobility scooters are road legal, and so can travel on the highway. By law, these have to be fitted with full lights and indicators. This type of electric scooter is larger and more luxurious than those designed to be dismantled and transported in a car boot. These disabled scooters are often purchased to replace a car, and so are much more powerful, and more rugged than a boot scooter. These disabled scooters usually have an adjustable and removable seat. The more luxurious seats recline and slide and some even have a headrest, like a car seat. Depending on the model of electric scooter, the seat may be upgraded to a larger, more comfortable more supportive seat.


Boot scooters are very popular and are designed to be transported, and can be taken apart in a matter of seconds. The seat and battery pack are easy to remove, and sometimes the scooter chassis will separate into two parts. Depending on the model of mobility scooter, the components may have handles incorporated into them to make putting them into a car boot even easier. Some models of small disabled scooter separate without the need to disconnect plugs or cables which makes transporting the electric scooter even easier.


These smaller mobility scooters, or boot scooters, are usually less luxurious than the larger electric scooters, and often do not have the same sort of features such as pneumatic tyres, full suspension or a highly adjustable seat. The maximum range that the scooter can travel is usually less, as is the weight capacity. Small mobility scooters


Another option is the pavement mobility scooter, which is a compromise between the boot scooter and the road legal scooter. These models of disabled scooter usually have some of the features of the larger scooters, such as lights and indicators, suspension, and a comfier seat than a boot scooter, but can usually still be dismantled for transportation. Some models have a top speed of 6mph, rather than the usual boot scooter top speed of 4mph.


A mobility scooter can bring back, or help to maintain independence, and allow long and short journeys to be enjoyed in both comfort and style.

For more information about mobility scooters and other mobility aids, please visit

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The Difference Between Mobility Scooters And Electric Wheelchairs

No Comments 11 August 2010

The Difference Between Mobility Scooters And Electric Wheelchairs

Living in a complicated, modern, technologically advanced and digitally revolutionised era, we have seen the more complex devices produced to the simplest of equipments improve in quality and functionality. From IPods to Mobile phones, through to stair lifts and electric wheelchairs we have certainly made things much easier for ourselves in terms of communication, entertainment and mobility. It is no surprise that those less physical able to move around independently have seen vast improvements in mobility devices and aids.


One of the more common and still modern mobility equipments is the mobility scooter, wheel chairs and electric scooter, which is not only a device for easy manoeuvring but also a good device for playing sports. Of course, you cannot play basketball or tennis with large mobility scooters; however, you can take part in many major sporting activities using a manual wheelchair. Top Paralympics athletes have shown impressive techniques to using a wheelchair when playing things like basketball, tennis and racing.


Mobility scooters should not be mistaken with electric wheelchairs, as they are two of different equipments. The only similarity is their ability to aid in manoeuvrability, however one is used more for internal use and the other is best used outside and for long distance travelling. These are not suitable for major sports and are only used for the sole purpose of migrating from one area to another.


Mobility scooters, although used only for moving and travelling long distances, are much slower and are good for people with weak upper body strength and physical disabilities in the legs. It is useful for people to use these for low key sporting activities such as golf, that require very little in mobility strength and is a light form of exercise. High impact sports is unsuitable mobility scooter users.


Wheelchair sports has grown to a massive scale, holding Paralympics sporting competitions and seeing wheelchair basketball champions begin to steal the limelight of world sports. The first wheelchair basketball game was founded in the USA of 1944, which was taken part by World War II veterans. This then spread across the globe with thousands of people taking part and spotting. This was also very quickly incorporated with the Paralympics, which was established at the same time by Ludwig Guttmann in England.


Wheelchair tennis was a sport that developed also in the USA and was founded around the late 1970s. This was not an easy development and required much more experimenting with optimising the wheelchair with playing tennis. The founder of wheelchair tennis was a young man named Brad Parks, who upon making a warm up jump on acrobatic skiing, injured himself and was made paraplegic.


Being a wheelchair user he experimented with playing tennis from his wheelchair upon hearing that athlete Jeff Minnenbraker had been playing tennis from a wheelchair. This sparked a strong interest for Parks and on his next rehabilitation session coincidently his therapist was Minnenbraker. They discussed playing tennis and this ensued with Minnenbraker providing Parks with tennis lessons. It became quickly obvious to Parks that a lightweight wheelchair was needed to play tennis and so they began developing design ideas.


Though this was a process, which took time, it soon gained much popularity and attracted fellow wheelchair users to take part. Eventually this became a global activity with the National Foundation of Wheelchair Tennis being founded in 1980. Since then this has become a popular sporting event, with competitions held every year. The International Wheelchair Tennis Federation was founded in 1989 with Brad Parks as the President of the project.


Sporting events such as these have made it possible for people with physical disabilities to feel more in control and independent.

Anna Stenning is an expert on mobility scooters, having helped people buy the right scooter and helped out in wheelchair sporting events.

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