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Deciding Between A Mobility Scooter And An Electric Wheelchair

No Comments 11 August 2010

Deciding Between A Mobility Scooter And An Electric Wheelchair

Advances in personal mobility products including scooters and electric wheelchairs have returned convenience, freedom, and independence to many seniors suffering from limited mobility. These advances, because there are now so many quality choices, have also necessitated a thorough review of options and needs to ensure that the eventual purchase of the mobility product results in the best solution for each individual. The following is a review of both personal mobility products including descriptions as well as the strengths and weaknesses of each.

Mobility Scooters:

These scooters allow for low cost mobility without the psychological weight of being confined to a wheelchair. Options include a variety of styles, colors, designs and upgrades and cover the full spectrum of uses from shopping to navigating uneven terrain.   These scooters come in three different model types:

* Three wheel – These models typically offer better handling in tight quarters and more leg room than other options.
* Four wheel – Built for a bearing weight of up to 500 pounds, these scooters offer more stability and heavy duty mobility than the three wheel mobility scooters.
* Compact scooters – For situations where storage or transportation options are limited, these scooters fold down to allow for placement in smaller areas whether in the house, car, or van.     
Steering and control of electric mobility scooters is usually done via handlebars much like those seen on bicycles and work best for owners that are not suffering from upper body mobility issues. Top speeds average around 8 miles per hour, with higher power models usable on roads, uneven terrain, and up steep hills. Another advantage of these scooters is that transporting them requires only a simple trailer which can easily be attached to the back of a car or van.
Personal mobility scooters are an extremely cost-effective solution toward re-building an individual’s mobility, freedom and independence. Scooters, ranging in price from ,000 for a basic model to ,000 for one that is fully loaded, are much lower in price than electric powered wheelchairs.

Electric wheelchairs:
Advances in electric wheelchairs have all but eliminated the old perception of the “loaner chairs” available at airports, shopping malls and amusement parks and replaced it with a personal mobility option loaded with high tech features and capabilities. These chairs come with four to six wheels, easy maneuverability, and programmable joysticks for ease of navigation.

Built for individuals with greater mobility issues, these electric wheelchairs offer durability, stability, and a wide array of seat movement options including motorized stand, tilt, support, and recline functions which can be tailored to individual needs.
Three major drawbacks of electric wheelchairs are that they don’t fold down, their considerable weight, and their cost. The weight and non-foldable nature of the chairs severely limits their use with standard cars, lifts and light duty trailers. These chairs function much better in customized vans where four point tie-downs make for a much safer and stable ride. Cost-wise, electric power wheelchairs are the most expensive type of personal mobility vehicle with prices for upgraded electric wheelchairs going up to around ,000.
Determining the right personal mobility product comes down to an assessment of needs.

Mobility scooters are work best for people who:

* Do not have upper body mobility issues
* Are using the scooter for relatively brief periods of time
* Will need to transport the scooter in a car

Electric power wheelchairs are probably best suited for those who:
* Need joystick based navigation due to upper body mobility issues
* Need posture support
* Will be in the chair for extended periods of time

Power Mobility Scooters: Whether you’re looking for a lift chair, a luxury adjustable bed, a power chair or a mobility scooter, The Mobility Scooters Store is the best place online to shop for all of your mobility products. Visit us online at Discount Mobility Scooters or call (877) 985-7679

stairlifts

The Difference Between Mobility Scooters And Electric Wheelchairs

No Comments 11 August 2010

The Difference Between Mobility Scooters And Electric Wheelchairs

Living in a complicated, modern, technologically advanced and digitally revolutionised era, we have seen the more complex devices produced to the simplest of equipments improve in quality and functionality. From IPods to Mobile phones, through to stair lifts and electric wheelchairs we have certainly made things much easier for ourselves in terms of communication, entertainment and mobility. It is no surprise that those less physical able to move around independently have seen vast improvements in mobility devices and aids.


One of the more common and still modern mobility equipments is the mobility scooter, wheel chairs and electric scooter, which is not only a device for easy manoeuvring but also a good device for playing sports. Of course, you cannot play basketball or tennis with large mobility scooters; however, you can take part in many major sporting activities using a manual wheelchair. Top Paralympics athletes have shown impressive techniques to using a wheelchair when playing things like basketball, tennis and racing.


Mobility scooters should not be mistaken with electric wheelchairs, as they are two of different equipments. The only similarity is their ability to aid in manoeuvrability, however one is used more for internal use and the other is best used outside and for long distance travelling. These are not suitable for major sports and are only used for the sole purpose of migrating from one area to another.


Mobility scooters, although used only for moving and travelling long distances, are much slower and are good for people with weak upper body strength and physical disabilities in the legs. It is useful for people to use these for low key sporting activities such as golf, that require very little in mobility strength and is a light form of exercise. High impact sports is unsuitable mobility scooter users.


Wheelchair sports has grown to a massive scale, holding Paralympics sporting competitions and seeing wheelchair basketball champions begin to steal the limelight of world sports. The first wheelchair basketball game was founded in the USA of 1944, which was taken part by World War II veterans. This then spread across the globe with thousands of people taking part and spotting. This was also very quickly incorporated with the Paralympics, which was established at the same time by Ludwig Guttmann in England.


Wheelchair tennis was a sport that developed also in the USA and was founded around the late 1970s. This was not an easy development and required much more experimenting with optimising the wheelchair with playing tennis. The founder of wheelchair tennis was a young man named Brad Parks, who upon making a warm up jump on acrobatic skiing, injured himself and was made paraplegic.


Being a wheelchair user he experimented with playing tennis from his wheelchair upon hearing that athlete Jeff Minnenbraker had been playing tennis from a wheelchair. This sparked a strong interest for Parks and on his next rehabilitation session coincidently his therapist was Minnenbraker. They discussed playing tennis and this ensued with Minnenbraker providing Parks with tennis lessons. It became quickly obvious to Parks that a lightweight wheelchair was needed to play tennis and so they began developing design ideas.


Though this was a process, which took time, it soon gained much popularity and attracted fellow wheelchair users to take part. Eventually this became a global activity with the National Foundation of Wheelchair Tennis being founded in 1980. Since then this has become a popular sporting event, with competitions held every year. The International Wheelchair Tennis Federation was founded in 1989 with Brad Parks as the President of the project.


Sporting events such as these have made it possible for people with physical disabilities to feel more in control and independent.

Anna Stenning is an expert on mobility scooters, having helped people buy the right scooter and helped out in wheelchair sporting events.

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